Replace Tile Floor

Replace Tile Floor

Tools & Materials Tools Buckets Line Chalk Chisel Drill with Bits Floor Scraper Hammer Knee Pads Marker Safety Glasses Spiral Mixer Tape Measure Tile Trowel Utility Knife Work Gloves Wrenches Materials Floor Tile Plastic Schluter-DITRA Schluter-KERDI-BAND Spacers Tape Unmodified Thinset Mortar Product costs, availability and item numbers may vary online or by market. Missing anything? Shop Online Before Work Begins Step 1 Choose the tile for your project. Floor tile comes in a range of materials, sizes, and colors. Types of floor tile include porcelain, ceramic, glass, and stone. Porcelain and ceramic work well for bathroom floors because they are dense materials and help resist water. Tile comes in a variety of sizes. Large tiles take the least amount of time to install. However, if you like the look of smaller tiles, check for products pre-mounted to mesh backing to make the installation easier. Tile is available in many colors, so you’re sure to find the right match for your bathroom. You can even use tile that looks like wood flooring. Don’t be afraid to get creative. Mix sizes and colors to create a custom pattern. If you need help with tile patterns and ideas, check out some of the many books in store. Two of the most common patterns for installation are jack-on-jack and running bond. (Pattern illustration) Step 2 Determine how much tile you’ll need by multiplying the length times the width of the room. Then add 10% for extra, just in case. When buying tile, try to find boxes with the same dye lot number. If you can’t find matching numbers, mix tiles from different boxes when you’re installing so any color difference won’t be as noticeable. If you special order your tile, you can schedule the prep steps of the project to be completed when your order is ready. Step 3 Taking on a tile install is a big project, so it’s best to have a plan before you start. This project will take a few days to complete. It takes time for the thinset mortar to set so you won’t be able to immediately walk on the floor. Also, it’s a good idea to check any local building codes and follow the specific instructions for your tile. You can lay tile over existing vinyl flooring or tile, but the subfloor and underlayment must be in good condition. It’s typically best to remove the old flooring so you can check the subfloor and underlayment. Plus, by removing the old flooring you won’t raise the height of the floor when you install the new tile. Remove the Old Tile Step 1 To remove old tile you’ll need to get a few things out of the way. Remove any base trim, and for bathrooms remove the toilet and vanity. If you remove your toilet, plug the drain with a rag to keep sewer gases from leaking into the room. Step 2 Removing tile can get dusty. Mask off the doorway with plastic, open windows, and use fans to blow the dust outside. As always, wear appropriate safety gear when doing demo work. Step 3 Use a hammer and chisel to break up a small area of the old tile. Once you have one tile broken up, it will be easier to get the chisel under the other tiles. Another good technique is to use the chisel to first break the grout lines. The demolition might take a little time at first, but it will move more quickly once you get the hang of it. Step 4 After you have removed the tile, use a floor scraper to remove any old thinset. Step 5 Determine your subfloor type. Knowing your type of subfloor will help you determine which specific materials you’ll need. Your subfloor will either be wood, concrete, or an old mortar bed. Step 6 Make any necessary repairs to the subfloor. The subfloor must be in good condition, uniform, the proper thickness, dry, clear of residue, and level. For concrete floors and mortar beds, patch minor cracks. If the mortar bed cracks are large, you should remove it. Use a hammer and chisel to open up the crack, then chip away. Some older mortar beds have wire mesh underneath. It should pull up with the mortar. For wood subfloors, make sure it’s solid. You might have to replace some of the wood. If your floor has any low spots, use a self-leveler. After the subfloor has been prepped, you can install the foundation for the tile. Install the Tile Membrane Step 1 This installation covers how to install Schluter-DITRA tile membrane. It’s a flexible membrane that allows for expansion underneath the tile. It also provides a strong foundation and protects the subfloor. Starting in a corner, roll the membrane across the floor and cut it at the wall. You can cut all the pieces at once. Just mark where they go on the floor. Also mark the edges of each run so you know where to spread the thinset. Use a utility knife to cut around pipes. Step 2 Check that the tile will fit under doorjambs and doors. Stack a tile on top of a piece of the membrane and hold it against the door trim. Cut the trim about 1/16 inch above the stack with a jamb saw. Cut the door about 1/8 inch above the stack. It’s easiest to remove the door and cut it with a circular saw. Step 3 Mix thinset mortar according to the package directions. Mix it loose, but not so thin that the ridges collapse on the floor. A 5 gallon bucket and drill with spiral mixer make this step easier. For concrete subfloors, use an unmodified mortar. For plywood subfloors, use modified mortar. Step 4 Apply the mortar to the subfloor with the flat side of a tile trowel. Then comb over it with the notched side. Comb it in one direction and do not make swirls. Step 5 Roll the membrane over the floor, fleece side down, and press it into the mortar using a wood float. Pull back a corner to check that the mortar is sticking to the membrane. You should see 50 percent the mortar on the floor and 50 percent on the fleece. Continue laying the membrane, keeping the pieces tight together. Step 6 To make the floor waterproof, seal the seams and floor-to-wall junctions with KERDI-BAND. Spread mortar over the seams, comb it, and press the band over it. You want a 2 inch overlap at all seams. Mark the Layout Step 1 Mark the center of two opposite walls and snap a chalk line between. Use hairspray to hold the chalk on the membrane or go over the line with a marker. Mark the other two walls to form a cross and check that it’s square. Step 2 Loose lay the tile with spacers along the lines. Leave a 1/4 inch gap at the perimeter for expansion. Step 3 If the layout gives you thin cuts at the sides, adjust the layout to get wider cuts, and mark new reference lines. Step 4 If you’re working in a large room, make a grid of 3 foot squares so you can work in smaller sections. Once you have marked the floor, you’re ready to start laying the tile. Check out our Install a Tile Floor video. Shop for Bathroom Floor Tile Shop for Grout and Mortar Shop for Tile Tools
replace tile floor 1

Replace Tile Floor

Next Up How to Remove Tile Flooring Often the first step to installing a new floor, removing an old tile floor takes time and a bit of elbow grease. How to Install a Mixed-Media Floor Learn how to install a unique mixed-media floor using hardwood and tile flooring. How to Remove and Add Vinyl Flooring Learn how to replace old vinyl flooring with these easy step-by-step directions. Art Deco Bath: Setting the Floor Tile Host Amy Matthews demonstrates how to lay floor tiles that’ll give a bathroom an Art Deco feel. How to Install Rubber Tile Flooring Rubber tile is a great flooring option for many types of rooms, especially workshops. Learn how to install rubber tile flooring in your home. How to Install a Tile Floor In a Kitchen Find out how to install a tile floor in this kitchen catch-up project. How to Lay a Pebble-Tile Floor Natural stone tile gives a walk-in shower a relaxing, spa-like feel. How to Install a Plank Tile Floor Instead of standard square tile, consider rectangular plank tile. They can make a narrow room look larger by running with the room’s width. How to Replace Underlayment in a Kitchen Learn how to replace the underlayment in a kitchen with these simple steps by the experts. How to Tile a Floor Tile is a nice addition to any basement. It protects against moisture and provides a visual contrast to the rest of the house. Follow these steps on how to install a tile floor.
replace tile floor 2

Replace Tile Floor

How to Remove Tile Flooring Often the first step to installing a new floor, removing an old tile floor takes time and a bit of elbow grease. How to Install a Mixed-Media Floor Learn how to install a unique mixed-media floor using hardwood and tile flooring. How to Remove and Add Vinyl Flooring Learn how to replace old vinyl flooring with these easy step-by-step directions. Art Deco Bath: Setting the Floor Tile Host Amy Matthews demonstrates how to lay floor tiles that’ll give a bathroom an Art Deco feel. How to Install Rubber Tile Flooring Rubber tile is a great flooring option for many types of rooms, especially workshops. Learn how to install rubber tile flooring in your home. How to Install a Tile Floor In a Kitchen Find out how to install a tile floor in this kitchen catch-up project. How to Lay a Pebble-Tile Floor Natural stone tile gives a walk-in shower a relaxing, spa-like feel. How to Install a Plank Tile Floor Instead of standard square tile, consider rectangular plank tile. They can make a narrow room look larger by running with the room’s width. How to Replace Underlayment in a Kitchen Learn how to replace the underlayment in a kitchen with these simple steps by the experts. How to Tile a Floor Tile is a nice addition to any basement. It protects against moisture and provides a visual contrast to the rest of the house. Follow these steps on how to install a tile floor.

Replace Tile Floor

Replace Tile Floor
Replace Tile Floor
Replace Tile Floor
Replace Tile Floor

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