Wood Bathroom Countertop

Wood Bathroom Countertop

thejoinery.com I wanted expert info about wood counters around sinks, so I talked to the folks at The Joinery, a Portland, Oregon, company that’s been hand-crafting fine wood furniture, cabinetry and countertops for 30 years. The beautiful countertop in this photo is made from edge-grain cherry and is finished with The Joinery’s custom blend of tung oil, linseed oil, citrus and beeswax. The craftspeople there used to use Landark natural oil finish until that company relocated; now they make their own blend. Although this finish requires you to wipe up water promptly, here’s a link to videos that show that the finish is easy to repair. You use the same process to repair a water ring as you use for a heat ring. The Joinery can make your countertops from many types of wood, but its butcher block tops are generally FSC-certified cherry or locally harvested madrone. Edge grain is not quite as hard as end grain, so it’s a little more susceptible to dents. Although a natural oil finish requires more upkeep, it gives you a natural wood look and is easier to repair. Kelly and Abramson Architecture If you have children and would like to have wood without worries about damage, why not go for wood that already has plenty of “damage” already? Reclaimed wood like this large piece of timber already has gouges, spots, marks and stains, so new ones are of little consequence. But there is another great idea in this photo. The sink is positively enormous, allowing up to three children to wash up at the same time. The back of the sink forms a seamless backsplash, with soap dishes attached. Such a large sink keeps splashes contained, and the placement of the soap completely within the sink means no dripping on the counter as you reach back and forth between faucet and soap.Architect Rob Kelley of Piedmont, California, who designed this bathroom, uses different finishes depending on the client’s desired level of maintenance. For this client, he used a beeswax, lemon oil and mineral oil combination from Natchez Solutions. This type of finish resists water quite well, although you do need to dry the counter rather than let water stand to avoid any spots. But here, the look of the rustic, reclaimed timber and the big sink minimizes this concern. The species of wood also makes a big difference, Kelley says. He said that redwood, yellow cedar, mahogany, white oak and teak are all naturally more resistant to water, and these are readily available on the West Coast of the U.S., where he works. Pangaea Interior Design, Portland, OR Ammonitum Sink and Countertop If you’re looking for the most carefree wood countertop, wood that has been treated with a waterproof varnish is the way to go. This gorgeous integrated sink and countertop is by Ammonitum, a manufacturer of luxury wood sinks, bathtubs and vanities. The company seals its wood bath furniture with 10 layers of waterproof varnish, a precise and lengthy process that results in a glassy, smooth finish requiring no special care. Just clean up toothpaste and soap with a damp cloth (don’t use abrasive cleaners). Lemon juice, red wine, oil and many other items do not affect the varnish. See the tests performed on their varnished wood. Nic Darling Most of the time, your wood countertops are just that — countertops. You should use a cutting board to protect your wood countertop or you’ll end up with cut marks all over it. But if you want the warmth of wood and the functionality of a commercial food prep area, then consider a large butcher block as a portion of your countertop. Tip: If you’d like to chop your vegetables directly on your counterop, use mineral oil, which is safe for food. Olive oil or corn oil on your countertop can become rancid. RemodelWest If you want to try your hand at making and finishing a wood countertop yourself rather than ordering a fully finished product, Waterlox is the sealer and finish that comes up repeatedly. The company offers more than one product, and a combination of its sealer and high-gloss coating can create a finish durable enough to be used as a bar top. While I was visiting The Joinery, I was showed a piece of wood treated with Waterlox in a satin finish. One of the employees keeps it on her desk and uses it as a coaster for her coffee cup. It was in perfect condition, with no stains or water spots. Although Waterlox is not currently offered as a prefinished option, the craftspeople at The Joinery will make an unfinished countertop for you and you can finish it yourself. In this sleek, streamlined bathroom the large, wide sink completely covers the countertop from back to front, making it impossible to drip water on the counter in front of or behind the sink. If a shelf were mounted above the sink to hold the soap, then you wouldn’t care about dripping water as you reached for that either. When you design a space with wood countertops, try to arrange your sink and soap so that all of your dripping goes into the sink instead of on the counter. You’ll do a lot less wiping up. Buckenmeyer Architecture In this kitchen, the undermount farmhouse sink allows you to wipe water straight into the sink. Undermount sinks make it far less likely that you’ll allow water to stand on the counter. Wall-mounted faucets also give you an entirely clear countertop, making it easier to give the area a quick wipe-down. Michael Tauber Architecture If you would like wood around your counter but are not convinced a wood countertop is for you, then what about a wood shelf on the wall above? You still get the look — safely out of the drip zone. Consider going part stone and part wood, creating warmth where everyone hangs out while having stone around the business end of the kitchen. You’ll still need to seal properly since people will set their drinks down here, but wood makes the breakfast bar a more comfortable place to rest your arms. Kelly and Abramson Architecture Architect Rob Kelley placed this wood counter on cabinetry away from the sink and had it finished with two coats of polyurethane floor varnish in a satin finish. Habitat Post & Beam, Inc. I love this wide wooden sink bowl with flattened ends that provide a little counter space. It is a similar idea to a photo earlier in this story, in that it makes use of a reclaimed item. The patina of age makes the surface more forgiving. Be sure to thoroughly treat holes drilled for drains or faucets with your sealer, and caulk to keep water from seeping into the edge of the wood. What do you think? Have I tempted you to try a wood countertop or sink in your kitchen or bath?
wood bathroom countertop 1

Wood Bathroom Countertop

As you may or may not know, we have started remodeling our tiny master bathroom. You know that dresser that a gave a makeover the other day? Well, it’s our new bathroom vanity! (or at least we’re working on it.) Here is a before picture, just for reference. There was one problem with the dresser/vanity swicharoo….the top of the dresser wasn’t deep enough for the sink I bought. It wasn’t even close actually,  the sink hung over by at least six inches. I really liked the sink I had bought and Adam suggested we just build a new countertop. Sold. We have built a few wood countertops before (we, haha…I mean Adam) and this time he decided to make things simple and create one out of wood flooring. Usually you make them out of wood planks (like we did in our other bathroom and for our farmhouse table) but to do it right you need a joiner, table saw, planer (or belt sander), kreg jig and bar clamps. We borrowed what we didn’t have in the past but this time Adam just wanted it to be simple. I’m guessing most of you don’t have those tools either, so this way is a nice alternative. You can use pretty much any flooring you want. For this project Adam wanted unfinished solid hardwood, but we used engineered and prefinished flooring (leftover from our floor) for the countertop in our laundry room. The unfinished wood was actually a little hard to find, Adam got some maple from a place called S & S Wood Floors in San Antonio. To make the countertop he just cut a piece of plywood to size and started gluing the planks on.  (Don’t you judge me just cause I have a washing machine on my front porch!) He added a piece to the front so that it looks clean and hides all the ugliness. And that’s about it…pretty simple. Next we just had to cut a hole for the sink and add sealer to make it water resistant. Cutting a hole for the sink is pretty easy too, here are the steps… Have your husband cut out the template. Have your husband tape the template to the counter (after careful measurements) and trace it. Have your husband put on his creepiest sweatshirt, haul the counter out to the garage, and cut the hole out with a jigsaw. Bam, done. How easy was that? Next Adam handed it over to me for finishing. I wanted the countertop to be dark, so I grabbed some stain (provincial by Minwax) and went to town… The second Adam got home from work that day he said “Holy crap babe, what did you do to  that countertop?” “What do you mean? I stained it. You don’t like it?” “Umm no, it looks terrible. Maple doesn’t stain well, you needed to leave it natural” So, defeated, I sanded it down and put on a coat of tung oil instead. Here’s the counter in our bathroom after three coats (I haven’t  sealed it yet)… Okay, let’s be honest…. I hate the color. I really wanted a dark rustic wood. Adam says we can’t stain cause….well, you know. I haven’t yet figured out how to make us both happy. But I will….you know I will.  Dang miscommunication. If only Adam count see the pictures inside my brain when he is buying wood. The maple is beautiful, really…its just not the right color. Here are a couple more pictures so you can form your own opinion…. I’m going to experiment with it a bit and will post again when I figure it out! UPDATE – I successfully stained the countertop, GO HERE to read that post. // //

Wood Bathroom Countertop

Wood Bathroom Countertop
Wood Bathroom Countertop
Wood Bathroom Countertop
Wood Bathroom Countertop
Wood Bathroom Countertop

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